The dating of eddic poetry. The dating of Eddic poetry : a historical survey and methodological investigation (Book, 1999) [pixelbraingames.com]

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Haukur Þorgeirsson

the dating of eddic poetry

Then Bur's sons lifted the level land, Mithgarth the mighty there they made; The sun from the south warmed the stones of earth, And green was the ground with growing leeks. A hall I saw, far from the sun, On Nastrond it stands, and the doors face north, Venom drops through the smoke-vent down, For around the walls do serpents wind. This is the first comprehensive and accessible survey in English of Old Norse eddic poetry: a remarkable body of literature rooted in the Viking Age, which is a critical source for the study of early Scandinavian myths, poetics, culture and society. Moreover, the prose added to the dialogues in Codex Regius stand out as learned footnotes to the drama and one must always advice against reconstructing a play on the basis of footnotes. Stanzas 36-39 describe the homes of the enemies of the gods: the giants 36 , the dwarfs 37 , and the dead in the land of the goddess Hel 38-39. This stanza and stanza 24 have been transposed from the order in the manuscripts, for the former describes the battle and the victory of the Wanes, after which the gods took council, debating whether to pay tribute to the victors, or to admit them, as was finally done, to equal rights of worship.

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eddic skaldic and beyond

the dating of eddic poetry

Prepared by recognized authorities, its articles treat their topics in sufficient depth to be of value to the scholar as well as to the general reader. At the time, versions of the were known in Iceland, but scholars speculated that there once was another Edda, an Elder Edda, which contained the poems that Snorri quotes in his. Eddic poetry and archaeology John Hines; 12. Possibly, as Finn Magnusen long ago suggested, there is something lost after stanza 24, but it was not the custom of the Eddic poets to supply transitions which their hearers could generally be counted on to understand. Against the serpent goes Othin's son. Was he familiar with the tradition in forms other than that of the poem? Rewarded by Othin for what she has thus far told stanza 30 , she then turns to the real prophesy, the disclosure of the final destruction of the gods. Andvari: this dwarf appears prominently in the Reginsmol, which tells how the god Loki treacherously robbed him of his wealth; the curse which he laid on his treasure brought about the deaths of Sigurth, Gunnar, Atli, and many others.

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Dating Eddic poems the archaeological way—Skírnismál and Vafþruðnismál

the dating of eddic poetry

Finnur Jonsson's claim for Norway, with Harald the Fair-Haired as the probable king in question, is much less impressive than Mogk's ingenious demonstration that the poem was in all probability composed in Denmark, in honor of either Gorm the Old or Harald Blue-Tooth. I nine worlds remember, nine trees, the great central tree, beneath the earth. The Volva here addresses Othin directly, intimating that, although he has not told her, she knows why he has come to her, and what he has already suffered in his search for knowledge regarding his doom. Surt: the ruler of the fire-world. A line may have been lost from this stanza. This volume focuses on Icelandic devotional poetry created during the early modern period.

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The Dating of Eddic Poetry

the dating of eddic poetry

Something--one or two lines, or a longer passage--has clearly been lost, describing the beginning of Jarl's journey. The poem was certainly not composed to tell a story with which its early hearers were quite familiar; the lack of continuity which baffles modern readers presumably did not trouble them in the least. According to these stories is the following poem: 1. Rig knew well wise words to speak, Soon in the midst of the room he sat, And on either side the others were. Scandinavian poetry in meters descended from the common Germanic alliterative poetic form.

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Eddic Poetry Research Papers

the dating of eddic poetry

Hofstadir: excavations of a Viking Age feasting hall in north-eastern Iceland. Nowhere was there earth nor heaven above. Nyi and Nithi, Northri and Suthri, Austri and Vestri, Althjof, Dvalin, Nar and Nain, Niping, Dain, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Nori, An and Onar, Ai, Mjothvitnir. Regius unites 36 with 37, but most editors have assumed a lacuna. Any young poems, on the other hand, are likely Icelandic in origin.

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Eddic poetry

the dating of eddic poetry

Eddic performance and eddic audiences Terry Gunnell; 6. Numerous Radiocarbon dates, as well as stratigraphic studies and artefact studies support the latest date of use for Stöng in the mid-1200s. Myths and Legends of Early Scandinavia is a high-quality collection that will be of value and interest to students and scholars of all levels. One came to their home, crooked her legs, Stained were her feet, and sunburned her arms, Flat was her nose; her name was Thir. Dan and Danp: These names are largely responsible for the theory that the Rigsthula was composed in Denmark. The chapters are also extensively cross-referenced, highlighting their interconnections. Its chapters offer overviews of essential topics that will certainly be of use in university courses and that can be practically referenced in current research for their concentrated and up-to-date surveys and discussions.

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Eddic

the dating of eddic poetry

All Jotunheim groans, the gods are at council; Loud roar the dwarfs by the doors of stone, The masters of the rocks: would you know yet more? Lines 3-5 are quoted by Snorri. Overview A Handbook of Eddic Poetry. The manuscript omits line 2, supplied by analogy with stanza 6. Heimdall: the watchman of the gods; cf. The fact that there is no prose accompanying the strophes in Vafþruðnismál speaks in favour of a rewritten poem and so does the Ragnarök theme, which together with a low-key performance will appeal to a Christian audience.

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eddic skaldic and beyond

the dating of eddic poetry

Carolyne Larrington is Official Fellow and Tutor at St John's College, University of Oxford. Presumably the stanza barring the last half-line, which was probably intended as the conclusion of the poem belongs somewhere in the description of the great struggle. These poems relate the most famous deeds of gods such as Óðinn and Þórr with their adversaries the giants; they bring to life the often fraught interactions between kings, queens and heroes as well as their encounters with valkyries, elves, dragons and dwarfs. Hill of twelve of Joseph Harris's most important essays underscores the range of his work from critical readings of canonical texts to philological elucidation of Old Norse and Old English literary works to discussions of theoretical issues such as oral theory. A serpent was fastened above Loki's head, and the venom fell upon his face. Lines from the Eddic poems sometimes appear in poems by known poets, but such evidence is difficult to evaluate. In stanza I the Volva, or wise-woman, called upon by Othin, answers him and demands a hearing.

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